Modifying 3D Models Through Interactive 2D Manipulations

Guillaume Caumon and Charles H. Sword and Jean-Laurent Mallet. ( 2000 )
in: Proc. 20th Gocad Meeting, Nancy

Abstract

More than just visualization tools, cross-sections can be powerful tools to edit interactively 3D models. In this paper, we consider the modification of 3D model surfaces through interactions in 2D or in 2.5D (a dimension characterizing non-planar surfaces embedded in 3D space). We define rules to state the effects topological modifications inside cross-sections have on the sliced 3D model. Another aspect of the problem concerns geometrical interactions. Several ways to represent and modify a line in an arbitrary 3D surface are described. The first approach, based on the parameterization of the cross-section, may not be accurate for an arbitrary section, especially if the section is a closed surface. The second approach uses the mesh topological information to represent and modify the line given a few points. The problem of how to propagate such modifications back onto the 3D model is then addressed, considering successively parameterization, discrete smooth interpolation, and sphere of influence methods.

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    BibTeX Reference

    @INPROCEEDINGS{T1115caumon,
        author = { Caumon, Guillaume and Sword, Charles H. and Mallet, Jean-Laurent },
         title = { Modifying 3D Models Through Interactive 2D Manipulations },
     booktitle = { Proc. 20th Gocad Meeting, Nancy },
          year = { 2000 },
      abstract = { More than just visualization tools, cross-sections can be powerful tools to edit interactively 3D
    models. In this paper, we consider the modification of 3D model surfaces through interactions in 2D
    or in 2.5D (a dimension characterizing non-planar surfaces embedded in 3D space). We define rules
    to state the effects topological modifications inside cross-sections have on the sliced 3D model. Another
    aspect of the problem concerns geometrical interactions. Several ways to represent and modify
    a line in an arbitrary 3D surface are described. The first approach, based on the parameterization of
    the cross-section, may not be accurate for an arbitrary section, especially if the section is a closed
    surface. The second approach uses the mesh topological information to represent and modify the line
    given a few points. The problem of how to propagate such modifications back onto the 3D model is
    then addressed, considering successively parameterization, discrete smooth interpolation, and sphere
    of influence methods. }
    }