Building 3D geological surfaces from field data using implicit surfaces

in: Proc. 27th Gocad Meeting, Nancy

Abstract

We present a method to build 3D geological horizons from sparse field data using implicit functions on tetrahedral meshes. The proposed technique accounts for typical types of field data: position and possibly orientation of horizons measured on the topographic surface, orientations measured within layers, fold axial surface and fold axis plunge. All types of data are recast as Discrete Smooth Interpolation constraints for a potential field on a tetrahedral mesh. In the current implementation, faults are accounted for by introducing topological discontinuities in the tetrahedral mesh before modeling horizons. Because an automatic solution is always questionable, interactive editing tools introduced by Frank and Mallet [2005] can be used for expert editing of the horizon geometry. The method is illustrated on the Sanguiniere depocenter in the Annot turbiditic formation, SE France.

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    BibTeX Reference

    @INPROCEEDINGS{P101_Caumon,
        author = { Caumon, Guillaume and Antoine, Christophe and Tertois, Anne-Laure },
         title = { Building 3D geological surfaces from field data using implicit surfaces },
     booktitle = { Proc. 27th Gocad Meeting, Nancy },
          year = { 2007 },
      abstract = { We present a method to build 3D geological horizons from sparse field data using implicit
    functions on tetrahedral meshes. The proposed technique accounts for typical types of field data:
    position and possibly orientation of horizons measured on the topographic surface, orientations measured
    within layers, fold axial surface and fold axis plunge. All types of data are recast as Discrete
    Smooth Interpolation constraints for a potential field on a tetrahedral mesh. In the current implementation,
    faults are accounted for by introducing topological discontinuities in the tetrahedral
    mesh before modeling horizons. Because an automatic solution is always questionable, interactive
    editing tools introduced by Frank and Mallet [2005] can be used for expert editing of the horizon
    geometry. The method is illustrated on the Sanguiniere depocenter in the Annot turbiditic
    formation, SE France. }
    }