Creeping flow equations for the simulation of large deformations and their possible application to structural restoration: a bibliographic review

Melchior Schuh-senlis and Paul Cupillard and Guillaume Caumon and J. Braun. ( 2018 )
in: 2018 Ring Meeting, ASGA

Abstract

Modelling the mechanical behavior of the subsurface at various spatial and temporal scales may be achieved using different rheologies and mechanical parameters in the same model. However, most numerical models have difficulties taking into account the impact of different rheologies, be- cause of the simultaneous application of the different mechanical laws, and the important resulting computation cost. This is particularly true in the representation of faults and salt behaviour in geomechanical restoration. Indeed, geomechanical restoration methods to date rely on considering the rock properties as fully elastic and applying boundary conditions, while restoring faults with geometric frictionless contact methods. Salt, however, has been proven to react as a Stokes viscous uid in geomechanics, and faults come from rocks reaching a plastic limit. Arbitrary Lagrangian Eu- lerian (ALE) methods have been widely used for salt modelling, implementing viscous Stokes ow in 2D, or even in 3D in some recent works. These methods could provide a new approach for modelling the whole subsurface behaviour. Indeed, in large deformations and long time standards (105 to 109 years), rocks have been found to be mainly ductile. This paper presents a bibliographic review of mechanical simulations of large deformations, of their application in geomechanical restoration, and of the possible use of creeping ow models to upgrade these simulations.

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BibTeX Reference

@INPROCEEDINGS{,
    author = { Schuh-senlis, Melchior and Cupillard, Paul and Caumon, Guillaume and Braun, J. },
     title = { Creeping flow equations for the simulation of large deformations and their possible application to structural restoration:  a bibliographic review },
 booktitle = { 2018 Ring Meeting },
      year = { 2018 },
 publisher = { ASGA },
  abstract = { Modelling the mechanical behavior of the subsurface at various spatial and temporal scales may
be achieved using different rheologies and mechanical parameters in the same model. However,
most numerical models have difficulties taking into account the impact of different rheologies, be-
cause of the simultaneous application of the different mechanical laws, and the important resulting
computation cost. This is particularly true in the representation of faults and salt behaviour in
geomechanical restoration. Indeed, geomechanical restoration methods to date rely on considering
the rock properties as fully elastic and applying boundary conditions, while restoring faults with
geometric frictionless contact methods. Salt, however, has been proven to react as a Stokes viscous

uid in geomechanics, and faults come from rocks reaching a plastic limit. Arbitrary Lagrangian Eu-
lerian (ALE) methods have been widely used for salt modelling, implementing viscous Stokes 
ow in
2D, or even in 3D in some recent works. These methods could provide a new approach for modelling
the whole subsurface behaviour. Indeed, in large deformations and long time standards (105 to 109
years), rocks have been found to be mainly ductile. This paper presents a bibliographic review
of mechanical simulations of large deformations, of their application in geomechanical restoration,
and of the possible use of creeping 
ow models to upgrade these simulations. }
}