Building 3D streamlines in gOcad

in: 21st GOCAD MEETING, Nancy

Abstract

Streamline technique are widely used in many reservoir engineering applications. The streamline technology consists in decomposing a 3D domain into a number of one-dimensional lines along which complex calculations (fluid flow, diffusion, thermal evolution) are done. The streamline approach offers substantial computational efficiency and numerical accuracy compared to traditional finite-element methods because it transforms a 3D diffusive problem into several 1D problems. Two methods were investigated to build a set of streamlines from a vector field sampled at grid nodes (SGrid or Voxet). The first one is a particle tracking algorithm based on a Runge-Kutta interpolator. The second method consists in using a DSI interpolator with a constraint parallel to velocity vector field. A 1D explicit finite-differences scheme simulator is then used to characterize compositional solution, saturation, or temperature evolution of a fluid along streamlines at each time step. The full 3D solution is then mapped onto the initial grid from the streamlines. This approach was validated on simple cases for which analytical solutions are known. This technology has been used to estimate the production temperature of the futur geothermal exchanger at Soultz, France.

Download / Links

    BibTeX Reference

    @INPROCEEDINGS{,
        author = { Voillemont, Jean-Charles and Royer, Jean-Jacques },
         title = { Building 3D streamlines in gOcad },
         month = { "jun" },
     booktitle = { 21st GOCAD MEETING },
       chapter = { 0 },
          year = { 2001 },
      location = { Nancy },
      abstract = { Streamline technique are widely used in many reservoir engineering applications. The streamline technology
    consists in decomposing a 3D domain into a number of one-dimensional lines along which complex
    calculations (fluid flow, diffusion, thermal evolution) are done. The streamline approach offers substantial
    computational efficiency and numerical accuracy compared to traditional finite-element methods
    because it transforms a 3D diffusive problem into several 1D problems. Two methods were investigated
    to build a set of streamlines from a vector field sampled at grid nodes (SGrid or Voxet). The first one is a
    particle tracking algorithm based on a Runge-Kutta interpolator. The second method consists in using a
    DSI interpolator with a constraint parallel to velocity vector field. A 1D explicit finite-differences scheme
    simulator is then used to characterize compositional solution, saturation, or temperature evolution of a
    fluid along streamlines at each time step. The full 3D solution is then mapped onto the initial grid from
    the streamlines. This approach was validated on simple cases for which analytical solutions are known.
    This technology has been used to estimate the production temperature of the futur geothermal exchanger
    at Soultz, France. }
    }