Simulation des dépots sédimentaires marins à l'aide de la technique des lignes de couran

Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine

Abstract

Understanding the mode of deposition of sediments in marine environment presents a stake in sedimentology and for the management of the energy raw materials. The main objective of this survey is thereby to provide tools allowing to build a three-dimensional simulation model for erosion, transport and deposition of clastic sediments in a marine environment. Erosion and deposition of sediments on the seafloor are represented by the means of empirical formulations parameterized by field data. The key parameters are: (i) the flow of suspended sediments invading the zone of interest and transported by marine currents; (ii) the granulometry distribution of clastic material; (iii) the velocity field of submarine currents. Transport of suspended sediments is calculated including diffusive, dispersive, and advective components and solving the differential equations by a finite element methods. Deposition of suspended clastic sediment matter is calculated as a function of velocity, water depth and granulometry. The streamline technique has been used to solve the coupled sedimentation--erosion--transport equations. This thesis presents thus also the set of tools for building streamlines onto triangulated surfaces that have been developed in the frame of this survey and recently integrated into the 3D-Streamline research plugin StreamLab. Several algorithms including direct methods or particle tracking techniques such as Euler, Runge-Kutta, or Pollock have been investigated. Following the methodology proposed by Prevost, the semi-analytical Pollock method has been implemented onto a regular quadrangle meshed surface and a triangulated surface using a local 2D-parametrization formulation. The tools were tested and calibrated by simulating flows and suspended sediment transport in simple illustrative cases. Deposition and erosion maps have been created.

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    BibTeX Reference

    @MASTERSTHESIS{Kedzierski2004Master,
        author = { Kedzierski, Pierre },
         title = { Simulation des dépots sédimentaires marins à l'aide de la technique des lignes de couran },
          year = { 2004 },
        school = { Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine },
      abstract = { Understanding the mode of deposition of sediments in marine environment presents a stake in sedimentology and for the management of the energy raw materials. The main objective of this survey is thereby to provide tools allowing to build a three-dimensional simulation model for erosion, transport and deposition of clastic sediments in a marine environment.
    Erosion and deposition of sediments on the seafloor are represented by the means of empirical formulations parameterized by field data. The key parameters are: (i) the flow of suspended sediments invading the zone of interest and transported by marine currents; (ii) the granulometry distribution of clastic material; (iii) the velocity field of submarine currents.
    Transport of suspended sediments is calculated including diffusive, dispersive, and advective components and solving the differential equations by a finite element methods. Deposition of suspended clastic sediment matter is calculated as a function of velocity, water depth and granulometry.
    The streamline technique has been used to solve the coupled sedimentation--erosion--transport equations.
    This thesis presents thus also the set of tools for building streamlines onto triangulated surfaces that have been developed in the frame of this survey and recently integrated into the 3D-Streamline research plugin StreamLab. Several algorithms including direct methods or particle tracking techniques such as Euler, Runge-Kutta, or Pollock have been investigated. Following the methodology proposed by Prevost, the semi-analytical Pollock method has been implemented onto a regular quadrangle meshed surface and a triangulated surface using a local 2D-parametrization formulation.
    The tools were tested and calibrated by simulating flows and suspended sediment transport in simple illustrative cases. Deposition and erosion maps have been created. }
    }