Use of archaeometallurgical slags as natural analogues for municipal/nuclear/industrial slagged wastes:from database to applications

C. Le Carlier Mahe and A. Ploquin and Christian Le Carlier de Veslud and Jean-Jacques Royer and M. Arnold. ( 1996 )
, 15th International Codata Conference

Abstract

The ecological dimension of industrial activity is becoming a strategic orientation for the future of the society as debated since the eighty's and the Rio conference. Among other problems, the reprocessing of wastes of different origins such as urban, industrial or nuclear are -the most important challenge. Several processes have been suggested to process these wastes. For instance, some countries have chosen to store their nuclear wastes after stabilization, while in France, a vitrification process after concentration of residuals is recommended. The vitrification is becoming a common technique for the treatment of hazardous toxic wastes. This process has three major advantages: flexibility, important volume reduction, long duration. It can be performed through a thermal process using a classical furnace, plasma or microwave technology. For example, a 500 OOOOt/yr municipal solid waste treatment plant produces about 125 000 t/yr of slags and 12 000 t/yr of fly-ashes plus fumes. The volume of fly-ashes is reduced by vitrification to about 9 to 12 t of glassy slags. In 1992, 80% of the 32 Mt of wastes produced by Japan was process using the vitrification technology. For the other countries these figures are : USA (36%; 28.6 Mt), Germany (40%; 9 Mt); France (38 to 45 %; 8Mt). The nuclear industry is also a waste producer. For the next coming 55 years (until 2050), the French CEA estimates a production of about 2 Mm3 for class A wastes (i.e. short time activity, less than 30 yr.) and about 0.4 Mm3 in class B (i.e. long time activity, but without heat production and neutron emitting). These wastes might be stabilized by vitrification and included into stabilized slags. As the slags production is world-wide increasing, it is important to characterize the long duration behaviour (from seculars to millions years), lixiviability and resistance to alteration of such hazardous by-products.

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    BibTeX Reference

    @PROCEEDINGS{,
        author = { Le Carlier Mahe, C. and Ploquin, A. and Le Carlier de Veslud, Christian and Royer, Jean-Jacques and Arnold, M. },
         title = { Use of archaeometallurgical slags as natural analogues for municipal/nuclear/industrial slagged wastes:from database to applications },
     booktitle = { Scientific Data in the Age of Networking - Their Use Global Prosperity and Better Human Life },
          year = { 1996 },
     publisher = { 15th International Codata Conference },
      abstract = { The ecological dimension of industrial activity is becoming a strategic orientation for the
    future of the society as debated since the eighty's and the Rio conference. Among other
    problems, the reprocessing of wastes of different origins such as urban, industrial or
    nuclear are -the most important challenge. Several processes have been suggested to
    process these wastes. For instance, some countries have chosen to store their nuclear
    wastes after stabilization, while in France, a vitrification process after concentration of
    residuals is recommended. The vitrification is becoming a common technique for the
    treatment of hazardous toxic wastes. This process has three major advantages: flexibility,
    important volume reduction, long duration. It can be performed through a thermal process
    using a classical furnace, plasma or microwave technology. For example, a 500 OOOOt/yr
    municipal solid waste treatment plant produces about 125 000 t/yr of slags and 12 000
    t/yr of fly-ashes plus fumes. The volume of fly-ashes is reduced by vitrification to about
    9 to 12 t of glassy slags. In 1992, 80% of the 32 Mt of wastes produced by Japan was
    process using the vitrification technology. For the other countries these figures are : USA
    (36%; 28.6 Mt), Germany (40%; 9 Mt); France (38 to 45 %; 8Mt). The nuclear industry
    is also a waste producer. For the next coming 55 years (until 2050), the French CEA
    estimates a production of about 2 Mm3 for class A wastes (i.e. short time activity, less
    than 30 yr.) and about 0.4 Mm3 in class B (i.e. long time activity, but without heat
    production and neutron emitting). These wastes might be stabilized by vitrification and
    included into stabilized slags. As the slags production is world-wide increasing, it is
    important to characterize the long duration behaviour (from seculars to millions years),
    lixiviability and resistance to alteration of such hazardous by-products. }
    }