Multivariate Geostatistical and GIS Methods for Mineral Exploration

Julian Ortiz and Guillaume Caumon. ( 2006 )
in: MININ 2006: 2nd International Conference on Mining Innovation, Santiago, Chile, pages 287-301

Abstract

Integrating information from diverse sources for characterizing an attribute of interest must account for the redundancy between these data. These sources may correspond to geological mapping, geophysical models, and drillhole or surface sample data. Quantifying the redundancy between the information provided by these different sources is complicated since each source may be measuring a different attribute (correlated with the attribute of interest), each data is available at a different support, with different precision and have been measured in a different domain (point samples, 2D maps, etc.). Multivariate geostatistics and geographical information systems provide some tools for using these diverse information sources to create a map of mineral potential or, more generally, a two or three dimensional model of a particular attribute of interest. In this work, we present the main methods available for aggregating information from diverse data sources and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each, pointing out some new avenues of research towards better ways to account for the redundant information they provide.

Download / Links

    BibTeX Reference

    @INPROCEEDINGS{Ortiz06,
        author = { Ortiz, Julian and Caumon, Guillaume },
         title = { Multivariate Geostatistical and GIS Methods for Mineral Exploration },
     booktitle = { MININ 2006: 2nd International Conference on Mining Innovation, Santiago, Chile },
       chapter = { 0 },
          year = { 2006 },
         pages = { 287-301 },
      abstract = { Integrating information from diverse sources for characterizing an attribute of interest must account for the redundancy between these data. These sources may correspond to geological mapping, geophysical models, and drillhole or surface sample data. Quantifying the redundancy between the information provided by these different sources is complicated since each source may be measuring a different attribute (correlated with the attribute of interest), each data is available at a different support, with different precision and have been measured in a different domain (point samples, 2D maps, etc.).
    
    Multivariate geostatistics and geographical information systems provide some tools for using these diverse information sources to create a map of mineral potential or, more generally, a two or three dimensional model of a particular attribute of interest. In this work, we present the main methods available for aggregating information from diverse data sources and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each, pointing out some new avenues of research towards better ways to account for the redundant information they provide. }
    }