Mechanics-based restoration: a physical and mathematical review.

in: 35th Gocad Meeting - 2015 RING Meeting, ASGA

Abstract

Structural restoration is a technique to recover the undeformed state of geological objects in the past. It is a tool often used by structural geologists for validating the consistency of a geological model. Over the last ten years, 3D mechanics-based restoration has been developed. Instead of solving a kinematic problem, mechanical laws of deformable solid are used to restore geological models. Such a problem is solved using finite element method. This paper aims at completely reviewing the theory and the implementation of mechanics-based restoration. It focuses on explicit restoration in which boundary conditions are imposed on mesh elements. A part of this paper is devoted to decompaction which is also based on mechanics of rocks. This review is a prelude of a discussion about the future challenges of mechanics-based restoration: integration of uncertainties, improvement of the used physics and the choice of the boundary conditions.

Download / Links

BibTeX Reference

@INPROCEEDINGS{ChauvinGM2015,
    author = { Chauvin, Benjamin P. and Mazuyer, Antoine and Caumon, Guillaume },
     title = { Mechanics-based restoration: a physical and mathematical review. },
 booktitle = { 35th Gocad Meeting - 2015 RING Meeting },
      year = { 2015 },
 publisher = { ASGA },
  abstract = { Structural restoration is a technique to recover the undeformed state of geological objects in the past. It is a tool often used by structural geologists for validating the consistency of a geological model. Over the last ten years, 3D mechanics-based restoration has been developed. Instead of solving a kinematic problem, mechanical laws of deformable solid are used to restore geological models. Such a problem is solved using finite element method. This paper aims at completely reviewing the theory and the implementation of mechanics-based restoration. It focuses on explicit restoration in which boundary conditions are imposed on mesh elements. A part of this paper is devoted to decompaction which is also based on mechanics of rocks. This review is a prelude of a discussion about the future challenges of mechanics-based restoration: integration of uncertainties, improvement of the used physics and the choice of the boundary conditions. }
}