Column Experiments and Numerical Modelling For In-Situ Leaching of Sandstone Hosted Copper Deposit

Gautier Laurent and Caroline Izart and L. O. Filippov and Fabrice Golfier and Philippe Marion and Robert Joussemet and Frederic Diot and Bénédicte Lechenard and Laurent Truche and Jean-Jacques Royer. ( 2017 )
in: Goldschmidt Abstracts 2017, pages 2216

Abstract

The BioMOre EU Horizon 2020 project (www.biomore.info) aims at developping “deep-in situ biomining” technology which have recently received an increasing attention from research and industry as a cost effective method for recovering metals from deep burried deposits. It consists in injecting a leach solution into the targeted ore body for dissolving base metal bearing minerals, collecting the pregant solution and in regenerating the leach solution thanks to micro-organisms. This technology is being experimented at reactor scale on a Kupferschiefer copper deposit in Poland as part of the BioMOre project. In this contribution, we present laboratory column experiments investigating the effect of a leaching solution in contact with copper bearing ore crushed at different grain sizes in suitable micro-organism environment conditions. Three stages including (i) water washing, (ii) acid leaching, and (iii) ferric-acid leaching, are successively implemented for progressively dissolving salts, carbonate minerals, and finally copper bearing sulfides. Models have been implemented in PhreeqC in parallel to the column experiments. They consider a one-dimensional double porosity transport model, where dissolution reactions are described by kinetics. We rely on BRGM’s Thermoddem databases [1]. Key parameters such as proportion of advective and diffusive phases, and effective diffusion coefficients were refined by fitting experimental results. The leaching process was then simulated in 3D at a deposit mesh scale by coupling one-dimensional PhreeqC models with a streamline-based fluid flow simulation approach. Such models will be further used within the BioMOre project for optimizing well-design planning and recovery forecasts.

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BibTeX Reference

@INPROCEEDINGS{,
    author = { Laurent, Gautier and Izart, Caroline and Filippov, L. O. and Golfier, Fabrice and Marion, Philippe and Joussemet, Robert and Diot, Frederic and Lechenard, Bénédicte and Truche, Laurent and Royer, Jean-Jacques },
     title = { Column Experiments and Numerical Modelling For In-Situ Leaching of Sandstone Hosted Copper Deposit },
 booktitle = { Goldschmidt Abstracts 2017 },
      year = { 2017 },
     pages = { 2216 },
       url = { https://goldschmidtabstracts.info/abstracts/abstractView?id=2017001687 },
  abstract = { The BioMOre EU Horizon 2020 project
(www.biomore.info) aims at developping “deep-in situ
biomining” technology which have recently received an
increasing attention from research and industry as a cost
effective method for recovering metals from deep burried
deposits. It consists in injecting a leach solution into the
targeted ore body for dissolving base metal bearing minerals,
collecting the pregant solution and in regenerating the leach
solution thanks to micro-organisms. This technology is being
experimented at reactor scale on a Kupferschiefer copper
deposit in Poland as part of the BioMOre project.
In this contribution, we present laboratory column
experiments investigating the effect of a leaching solution in
contact with copper bearing ore crushed at different grain
sizes in suitable micro-organism environment conditions.
Three stages including (i) water washing, (ii) acid leaching,
and (iii) ferric-acid leaching, are successively implemented
for progressively dissolving salts, carbonate minerals, and
finally copper bearing sulfides.
Models have been implemented in PhreeqC in parallel to
the column experiments. They consider a one-dimensional
double porosity transport model, where dissolution reactions
are described by kinetics. We rely on BRGM’s Thermoddem
databases [1]. Key parameters such as proportion of advective
and diffusive phases, and effective diffusion coefficients were
refined by fitting experimental results.
The leaching process was then simulated in 3D at a
deposit mesh scale by coupling one-dimensional PhreeqC
models with a streamline-based fluid flow simulation
approach. Such models will be further used within the
BioMOre project for optimizing well-design planning and
recovery forecasts. }
}