Constitution and Structure of Earth's Mantle : Insights from Mineral Physics and Seismology

A. Zunino and A. Khan and Paul Cupillard and Klaus Mosegaard. ( 2016 )
in: Integrated Imaging of the Earth : Theory and Applications, pages 219-243, Wiley & Sons

Abstract

Geophysical, geochemical, and petrological methods have played prominent roles in determining constitution and structure of the Earth. Most of Earth’s interior remains geochemically unsampled, however, and direct measurements or numerical simulations of physical properties (e.g., elasticity and density) of natural samples and analogs at the physical conditions of the deep Earth allow us to compare with properties obtained from geophysical field models. These sources constitute a large complement of information that helps constrain possible models of Earth’s mantle (and core) composition, temperature, and mineralogy. Traditionally, therefore, inference has proceeded by way of estimating “laboratory‐based” profiles of physical properties with the intent of comparing these with field‐derived estimates. A more definitive approach, however, resides in integrating data and results from experimental measurements, theoretical considerations, and inverse calculations to directly transform geophysical data into the main parameters of interest. In this study, we describe a quantitative approach that integrates data and results from mineral physics, petrological analyses, and geophysical inverse calculations to map geophysical data directly for mantle composition and thermal state. Computation of physical properties using thermodynamic models is described and discussed, and an application of the joint inverse methodology is illustrated in a case study where mantle composition and thermal state beneath continental Australia is determined directly from seismic data.

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BibTeX Reference

@INCOLLECTION{,
    author = { Zunino, A. and Khan, A. and Cupillard, Paul and Mosegaard, Klaus },
     title = { Constitution and Structure of Earth's Mantle : Insights from Mineral Physics and Seismology },
 booktitle = { Integrated Imaging of the Earth : Theory and Applications },
    series = { AGU Monograph Series },
      year = { 2016 },
     pages = { 219-243 },
 publisher = { Wiley & Sons },
       doi = { 10.1002/9781118929063 },
  abstract = { Geophysical, geochemical, and petrological methods have played prominent roles in determining constitution
and structure of the Earth. Most of Earth’s interior remains geochemically unsampled, however, and direct
measurements or numerical simulations of physical properties (e.g., elasticity and density) of natural samples
and analogs at the physical conditions of the deep Earth allow us to compare with properties obtained from
geophysical field models. These sources constitute a large complement of information that helps constrain
possible
models of Earth’s mantle (and core) composition, temperature, and mineralogy. Traditionally, therefore,
inference has proceeded by way of estimating “laboratory‐based” profiles of physical properties with the intent
of comparing these with field‐derived estimates. A more definitive approach, however, resides in integrating data
and results from experimental measurements, theoretical considerations, and inverse calculations to directly
transform geophysical data into the main parameters of interest. In this study, we describe a quantitative
approach that integrates data and results from mineral physics, petrological analyses, and geophysical inverse
calculations to map geophysical data directly for mantle composition and thermal state. Computation of physical
properties using thermodynamic models is described and discussed, and an application of the joint inverse
methodology is illustrated in a case study where mantle composition and thermal state beneath continental
Australia is determined directly from seismic data. }
}