Modeling Sedimentary Structures using Deformable Templates.

in: Proc. 32nd Gocad Meeting, Nancy

Abstract

The interpretation of sedimentary structures from surface and subsurface data is a complex task. Classical manual picking approaches to interpret the abundance of sedimentary multidimensional structures in sedimentary contexts are very tedious. In this work we propose to build sedimentary structures by deforming theoretical reference shapes. A robust mathematical foundation for building elementary shapes is to use Non-Uniform Rational Basis Splines (NURBS). NURBS are piecewise-defined parametric rational functions controlled by a small number of control points in space. This type of structures is well-suited to generate templates of typical geobodies. This methodology is applied for clastic environments including meandering rivers, point-bars, oxbow lakes and abandoned meanders. To illustrate the method, we construct theoretical models of a channel, and we deform this template to fit the observed shape in a satellite image.

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BibTeX Reference

@INPROCEEDINGS{RuiuGM2012,
    author = { Ruiu, Jeremy and Caumon, Guillaume and Viseur, Sophie and Antoine, Christophe },
     title = { Modeling Sedimentary Structures using Deformable Templates. },
 booktitle = { Proc. 32nd Gocad Meeting, Nancy },
      year = { 2012 },
  abstract = { The interpretation of sedimentary structures from surface and subsurface data is a complex task. Classical manual picking approaches to interpret the abundance of sedimentary multidimensional structures in sedimentary contexts are very tedious.
In this work we propose to build sedimentary structures by deforming theoretical reference shapes. A robust mathematical foundation for building elementary shapes is to use Non-Uniform Rational Basis Splines (NURBS). NURBS are piecewise-defined parametric rational functions controlled by a small number of control points in space. This type of structures is well-suited to generate templates of typical geobodies.
This methodology is applied for clastic environments including meandering rivers, point-bars, oxbow lakes and abandoned meanders. To illustrate the method, we construct theoretical models of a channel, and we deform this template to fit the observed shape in a satellite image. }
}